Interview with Kyell Gold

Oct. 22nd, 2017 06:22 pm
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[personal profile] rowyn
Kyell Gold is one of my fellow authors in the SFWA Fantasy Storybundle. He kindly agreed to let me interview him, which I was very excited to do because I'd just read and greatly enjoyed his book, Black Angel. I had many questions for him!


You've had a long career as both author and editor! Please share some of the highlights.

I feel like my career is full of highlights. I've been invited to a number of conventions as a guest in places like Dallas, Minneapolis, Seattle, Toronto, Berlin, and Melbourne and Gold Coast, Australia. I've met some truly remarkable people, and conducted a number of panels. I've gotten countless letters from people whose lives have been touched by my books, and each one of those is special. Making the decision to move to writing full-time was a highlight, and teaching at the first residential writing workshop for the furry fandom was another.


There's something of a spectrum in furry fiction, from "these characters could have been human but are furry for aesthetic purposes" (like Disney's Robin Hood) to "this story would make no sense if the characters were human" (such as Richard Adam's Watership Down). Where do you feel your work fits in? Is furriness more plot-critical in some of your books than others?

I'm probably more on the Robin Hood end of the scale, but I always try to work some aspect of the furriness into the plot of the books. Meg's story, because she's an otter, incorporates a lot of water imagery. Green Fairy, the first book in the series, starts with a wolf telling his family that he doesn't want to eat meat anymore.


Two real-world religions figure significantly in Black Angel: vodou and Christianity. What led you to choose those religions in this story? What research did you do to help you portray them?

Christianity is what I'm familiar with, having grown up in it. Like any dominant religion, it is vulnerable to having its principles twisted to create an inequal society. In this case, I was taking the example of some small groups who use Christian texts to justify restricting women's rights. Vodou I chose for the opposite reason: it's a misunderstood religion that puts women in positions of power--the most famous practitioner is Marie Laveau.

To research fundamentalist Christianity, I looked through contemporary news articles (sadly). For vodou, I walked through a traveling museum exhibit, read two books on late 1800s New Orleans, and visited modern day New Orleans to see a voodoo temple and talk to a voodoo priestess (as part of a tour of haunted New Orleans, so I had to take that with a grain of salt, but it was valuable).



One of the characters in Black Angel self-medicates her depression with alcohol and pot, neither of which she can acquire legally. These are fraught subjects, and I am curious to hear more of your thought process on making both self-medication and depression part of the story, and the way you chose to present them.

Depression is something that over the last decade I've become more educated about and aware of. I believe in the power of demystifying through fiction--part of why I like writing about gay relationships is that many people don't have an established idea of what those relationships are like, and many gay people don't have a lot of representation in fiction. I wrote a short story about depression a while back that won an Ursa Major Award ("How To Get Through The Day"), and I thought it would be good to revisit the subject with more education and feel for the complexity of it. I'd like people suffering from depression to feel that they're not alone, even if their company is a fictional character.

As for the alcohol and pot use, well, that's something that teens do. I don't advocate it, but neither does it feel right to completely ignore it. I tried to present their use in a balanced light. Ultimately, neither is really a good solution to the character's problem.



I love your use of mixed first and third-person, and past and present tense in Black Angel. One doesn't see those mixed often, and seldom to such good effect. How did you come up with it?

I've always liked playing around with points of view and ways to tell a story. When I wrote the first book in the series, I was trying to meet the challenge of melding a historical narrative with a modern-day one, and I wanted them to be stylistically distinct. The historical narrative--one of them--was supposed to be an autobiography of sorts, and so having it in first person made sense. I kept that theme going in the rest of the series--each of the books has multiple narratives with different points of view. For Black Angel, in fact, the main narrative was originally in third person, as the main ones were in the previous books, and I was struggling with which of the side narratives to put in first person, because neither felt right. It seems strange that it didn't occur to me until I'd already written several chapters that Meg should be the one in first person, because it felt so natural when I switched it.


The book blurb on StoryBundle made me think that Meg's sexuality would be something like "girl assumes she is straight and then later figures she's either bi or lesbian." I found the actual text is much more nuanced and interesting than that, and would like to invite you to elaborate on Meg's theme of "really, I'm 19, I have done research, and I don't actually know how I feel" and the way most of her friends push/encourage her to Make a Choice or at least Try Things. What drew you to this subject?

Any gay person over 30 has probably been told at least once in their life that they're not really gay, it's just a phase, they just need to meet the right man/woman, etc. Bisexual people are told that they're just gay and in denial. Mainstream America's repertoire of knowledge about sexual orientation is expanding, but there are still people who, when they encounter something outside of it, will try to slot it into an existing box. A trans friend of mine made a really important distinction between two behaviors from friends of hers. Some of them would *tell* her what she was going through; the others *asked* her and listened to her story. I think that's really important, and all of us fall into that trap. Often it's out of the best of intentions: we see someone confused and we want to help them. But we have to listen to them articulate the kind of help they actually want, the kind that will be of the most benefit to them.


Black Angel has several interior illustrations by your cover artist, Rukis. Do you regard the artwork as integral to the story, or a way to help readers visualize the characters/setting, or something else?

With furry fiction, illustrations really help readers visualize the characters. As you noted, there are a lot of different variations in the way people create their characters, and rather than awkward descriptions that rely on referents outside the world of the story, it's nice to have an illustration to put the image into the reader's mind.


What furry and/or fantasy authors have you found inspirational or formative in your work?

Madeleine L'Engle was the first fantasy author I read, and I read her work over and over again. Her feel for genuine characters and the way human challenges are at the core of any story have been inspirations my whole life. Andre Norton was another author whose works I devoured. Most recently, I've found David Mitchell an inspiration.

In the furry fandom, my friends and colleagues Watts Martin, Ryan Campbell, Malcolm Cross, and Kevin Frane have written some great stuff that's inspired me to keep getting better.



Black Angel is a standalone novel, but it's also part of the three-book Dangerous Spirits series. Tell us more about the other books in the series. Is there a recommended reading order? Will there be more books in the setting?

Green Fairy, the first one I wrote, follows Sol, a wolf, through his struggles to get through the last year of high school with a long-distance boyfriend. He finds some solace in a book written by a gay chamois in 1900s Paris, but then starts to dream that he's one of the other characters in the book and gets a different perspective on the story. The dream starts creeping into his waking life, and things quickly get bad both in his life and in his dreams. This story is about confidence in yourself despite the views of the people around you.

Red Devil is Alexei's story--Sol's fox friend--and picks up after they've left high school. Alexei fled an abusive family in Russia, but his sister is still there and he's trying to get her home. At the same time, he's having issues of confidence with a guy he wants to date, so he decides to try summoning Sol's ghost. But the summoning goes wrong and brings him an old Russian soldier who does not approve of his life. This book focuses a lot on issues of family, what it means to be family and who constitutes your family.

I'd recommend starting with Green Fairy and going on to Red Devil and then Black Angel, because that's the chronological order of the story, and while they all stand alone, each of the later books contains a bit of spoiler for the previous ones. As for continuing the series...no plans right now. I'm not sure where I'd go with it. But I do have a new book coming out this year, Camouflage, that is kind of a spiritual cousin to this series. Except it has actual time travel in it.

Lunar Tunnels

Oct. 22nd, 2017 01:12 pm
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
 Tunnels have been confirmed on the Moon.  While these make a promising site for settlement, I would prefer to make sure there are plenty of them before wrecking the first one we've found.

Half-Price Sale in Polychrome Heroics

Oct. 22nd, 2017 12:23 pm
ysabetwordsmith: Damask smiling over their shoulder (polychrome)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
Today is the last day of the half-price sale in Polychrome Heroics, so if you're still planning to buy anything, now's the time. 

So far I have sold four poems.  Three of those have been posted.  "A Moment of Atonement" hasn't been posted yet.  There are also two poems in a pool, the Iron Horses entries "Come Out of the Darkness" and "Sheltered and True."  Contact [personal profile] ng_moonmoth if you are interested in contributing toward those.

The Most Dangerous Man in the World

Oct. 22nd, 2017 03:15 am
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
A whole lot of "water is wet" observations, but I do admire the precision of analysis in listing specific actions of #45 and why they are troubling.
dialecticdreamer: My work (Default)
[personal profile] dialecticdreamer
Risk Everything for Family
by Dialecticdreamer/Sarah Williams
part 6 of 14
word count (story only): 1751




:: Part of the Polychrome Heroics universe, the Mercedes story set, and picks up immediately after “Popping In,” continuing from Graham's viewpoint. ::




Graham's feet refused to carry him more than eight inches past the front door. He took in the shape of the space, and the archway into the dining area, the counter and hanging cupboards that marked off the galley kitchen, and the tall bookcases flanking a field stone hearth, but despite the early Art Deco touches in the woodwork, reinforced by the color scheme, the overwhelming impression was not a subdued, harmonious pastel palette. “It feels like everything is almost shouting at me,” Graham whispered. “Would one of my shielding exercises help?”

“Yes,” Aidan assured, guiding Graham to the nearest recliner. He swept his hands over the back and seat, then eased the blond man through the process of sitting down. “You know, this may explain why so many of your children have open gifts like empathy; you're aware, receptive, and observant to a degree that startles me as much as it arms my heart.”

“I'm pretty average--” Graham protested.

Aidan cut off the comment with a quick shake of his head. “No. You aren't. You have a few biases, a few bad habits and unsupported opinions, but you are nowhere near the closed-minded maze of pigeonholes and dead ends that makes up an 'average' American, even when they think they're both liberal and supportive.” He snickered. “Now, I can't say this any less indiscreetly than,” he wagged his eyebrows playfully, “your wife has got to be something special!”
Read more... )

Poem: "Capable of Stretching"

Oct. 21st, 2017 03:55 pm
ysabetwordsmith: Damask smiling over their shoulder (polychrome)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
This poem was written outside the regular prompt calls but follows on prompts from [personal profile] dialecticdreamer, [personal profile] ari_the_dodecahedron, [personal profile] zeeth_kyrah, and [personal profile] nsfwords. It also fills the "healthy touch" square in my 7-31-17 card for the Cottoncandy Bingo fest. It has been sponsored by Anthony & Shirley Barrette. This poem belongs to the Shiv thread of the Polychrome Heroics series. It relates to events in "An Atmosphere of Shame" and "Everything That Is Real About Us," so read those first or this won't make much sense.

Warning: This poem contains some intense material. Highlight to read the warnings, some of which are spoilers. It includes anxiety, forboding, fear of communication, many references to Shiv's awful past, because the inside of Shiv's head is always a warning, feeling trapped, boundary issues, impaired consent, talking about scars, extreme body modesty, touch aversion, references to past malpractice in mental care, touching which is unwanted but permitted, graphic description of past abuse, poor self-assessment skills regarding physical and mental complaints, defensive lying which has become a reflex to the point that Shiv often can't tell the truth even when it would benefit him more than a lie, vulgar language, resistance to help, minor violence (not directed at a person), emotional flashbacks, overload, desperation, scary basement memories, and other challenges. This poem may be extra-stressful for people with a history of therapeutic abuse, toilet abuse, and/or child molestation. If these are touchy topics for you, please consider your tastes and headspace before reading onward.

Read more... )

Saturday Yardening

Oct. 21st, 2017 03:52 pm
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
Today is partly sunny, breezy, and warm. 

We went out and looked at yardwork projects together.  We picked out a place to plant the big bag of bulbs, and Doug mowed that along with the paths in the prairie garden.  Since we're supposed to get some rain tonight and tomorrow, I'm waiting on that before planting them, so the ground will be softer.

I also picked up sticks around the house, since that yard will need to be mowed later.

Late monarchs are fluttering around the prairie garden.

EDIT 10/21/17: I went back out and dug up some toadstools so the south lot can be mowed.

Poem: "Death Whispers at the Tip"

Oct. 21st, 2017 12:17 am
ysabetwordsmith: Damask smiling over their shoulder (polychrome)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
This poem was written outside the regular prompt calls, inspired by the "teamfamily" square in my 5-29-17 card for the Pride Bingo fest. It has been sponsored by Anthony & Shirley Barrette. It belongs to the Polychrome Heroics series.

Warning: This poem deals with some touchy topics. Highlight to read the warnings, some of which are spoilers. It features bald women, messy medical details, references to past cases of cancer, infertility, distracting visions of Amazon life, historic references to dubious consent and inane attitudes, fostering, failed conversions, frank talk about death, and other challenges. If these are sensitive issues for you, please consider your tastes and headspace before reading onward.

Read more... )
dialecticdreamer: My work (Default)
[personal profile] dialecticdreamer
Risk Everything for Family
by Dialecticdreamer/Sarah Williams
part 5 of 14
word count (story only): 1507




:: Part of the Polychrome Heroics universe, the Mercedes story set, and picks up immediately after “Popping In,” continuing from Graham's viewpoint. ::




Aidan shrugged. “She's a foster child right now. That means that the psychologist at the relevant office will want to observe her several more times before the adoption is fully approved and legal. I know that she will need more therapy than they have time for in a dozen years, let alone one, but… I'm hoping that the two of you will be a good match, since I doubt that she'll be ready for preschool at four without a great many hours of effort from all of us.”

Graham nodded. “Okay, got it.” He pointed at Aidan. “Just so you know, I'm a lot harder to scare off than the feeble effort you're putting in here.”

“Feeble effort?” Aidan's eyes widened. Slowly, he began to snicker. “You're even braver than I suspected.”

“Brave, perhaps reckless, but definitely focused and determined,” Graham agreed, sticking out his hand. “I am also firmly on your side and Saraphina's. Truce?”

“It wasn't a conflict, or even a full-scale test,” Aidan admitted, clasping forearms with the blond. “Friends,” he offered.
Read more... )

Peanuuuuut, Peanut Butter! No Jelly!

Oct. 20th, 2017 08:52 pm
zhora: Yeah, you've probably seen it before! XD (Default)
[personal profile] zhora
For the last several years while healing up from my brain injuries and managing the resulting Ramsey-Hunt, I have had to avoid foods heavy in arginine, like peanuts and corn.  No more Reeses, no more popcorn, and certainly no more PB & Pepsi lunches that has been an occasional treat since I was a little kitling. 

No wheat, either, but since I recently discovered that if its the crappiest of crappy white bread I can eat with no reaction, I decided to try pb again - but the pure stuff that only has peanuts and salt, and maybe a little natural oil.  No Jif, in other words.  A jar of creamy Adams it was...and I enjoyed the hell out of it without any problem! 

Corn, however seems to still be a problem, tho not corn syrup which is in everything anyway.  This lines up with the findings of the restrictive allergy test diet I had to suffer through in 6th grade.  Even tho I only turned out to have allergies to milk, eggs, and chocolate at the time, I did have to spend weeks without corn and wheat, too.  Bigass production it was, and no one else in my family on it like people do nowadays in solidarity.  Parents even outright said they weren't going to make the rest of the family suffer with me, making me a pariah. :P  I dropped all my baby weight on that diet (yeah, I was a chunky kid, more a reader and a casual hiker than a run-arounder).   The worst part was, tho, that every time we went somewhere in the car and stopped at a gas station for snacks during the diet and after, while everyone else got chocolate I could only get Bit-o-Honey or Velamints.  

Fucking Velamints.  I can still remember their mouth feel and taste decades later. :P :P  Ironically if I had to go on that diet today, I couldn't even have Bit-o-Honey, 'cause they're mostly corn syrup now. Fuck Velamints.  I haven't had any since we moved to WA before 7th grade and my parents suddenly decided not to be so restrictive with the snacks for some reason, other than reminding me constantly about my chocolate allergy.

That allergy I grew out of, tho seems the corn has taken up the mantle.  Milk still stuffs me up a little, but its fine, and I can eat eggs but I can't take vaccines cultured in them which is a really convenient excuse for not getting the flu shot.  The military outright refused to give me flu shots during my service, but they did shoot me up with everything else that was not cultured in eggs as the military is wont to do.

But now, I can fire up the ol' Salton Peanutbutter Maker!  Lucky I didn't give it away back when I stopped eating pb!  I mix soy sauce in instead of salt, and sometimes honey.  I'll have to mix up some pb noodles, too, soon - wonder how the sauce would taste on moroheiya or buckwheat noodles.  Probably delicious.

--Zhora

Today's Adventures

Oct. 20th, 2017 10:12 pm
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
Today we saw the Ikebana exhibit at Krannert.  It was small, but very pretty.  It's worth going if you're in Champaign-Urbana or very close, but not worth a longer drive.  Only the demonstration is listed on the website, but the free exhibit is open Friday-Sunday.  They had many things in styles I recognized, and a few plants I'd never seen before.  Also a style I'd never seen before: bark, metal, and flowers all glued to a flat board.  That was pretty cool.  There were several of the classic spiral vases with two openings.  My favorite, however, was an arrangement which used a big silver dryer hose curled into the same spiral -- simultaneously referencing the very old spiral vase and modern Japan's tech base and love of all things robotic.  It was just SO JAPANESE.  But I bet it's like the Hokusai wave, nobody will get it for a few decades and then suddenly it will be the most Japanese thing EVAR.

I couldn't help think of Terramagne.  People there often weave their hobbies into work.  If you go into a business, you may see the owner's collection of china plates over the door.  Things like flower arranging are often done by clubs, where you can pay a higher fee to take it home to display in your house or business, but a lower fee if you just want to make something fun and then it goes to a library or hospital or women's shelter where lots of people can enjoy it.  And all that stuff gives folks something to talk about as they go through their day.  "Did you see the new painting in Burger Bash?  Carrie's son did a giraffe this time." "Yeah, he's getting really good."

We visited with my parents and dropped off a batch of poetry, already sponsored.  I don't know whether I'll have time to post this tonight or wait until tomorrow.  You can look forward to "Death Whispers at the Tip," "Capable of Stretching," and "A Moment of Atonement."



For supper, we went to a new Japanese restaurant in Danville called Fujiyama.  I am only somewhat a fan of Japanese cuisine -- I love sushi but can't each much of it -- and not at all a fan of flaming tables.  This place greatly exceeded my expectations.  First, the performance area is separate from the regular dining area, so that was a big relief.  People who want excitement can get it without bothering people who want to relax.  \o/  Second, the menu has lots of tasty things to choose from.  I picked out two different appetizers to fill up on (pork dumplings and coconut shrimp) and then had a piece of the sushi that other folks got (California Roll, Spicy Volcano Roll, and Bayridge Roll.  Where things really got interesting: they will make "reasonable substitutions" in the sushi constructions if there are things you can't eat; replacing avocado with cream cheese is a standard  substitution.  :D  I have never found a sushi place that would change anything, they all acted like their recipes were dipped in gold or something.  So if you are looking for a special-diet-friendly sushi place, check out Fujiyama.

My father sent home a bag of 30 bulbs, which at a quick glance seem to be a random mix of tulips and daffodils.  I think I will plant them in the prairie garden en masse.

See "Molly Beans: "Assessment"

Oct. 20th, 2017 09:23 pm
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
 I love this episode, especially the fanservice in the final exchange.

Episode Discussion: Uncommon Bond

Oct. 20th, 2017 09:11 pm
southern_belle30: (Default)
[personal profile] southern_belle30 posting in [community profile] equestriamlp
 Episode discussion #167: Uncommon Bond

Brony TV

World of Equestria

Brony Network

Bronystate

Otaku Ascended

Mahlibalazs

Equestria Reflection

Plug DJ FiM

Haxmega

Equestria TV

ON DEMAND
YouTube/HD
DailyMotion

(no subject)

Oct. 20th, 2017 01:27 pm
arethinn: Ravenclaw logo on blue and yellow background, text "Ravenclaw: Nerd." (geeky (ravenclaw nerd))
[personal profile] arethinn
It kind of annoys me that Darth Vader's name authority record (which, despite being a fictional character, he has instead of a subject authority because of reasons) treats "Darth" as a forename and not as a title. 100 1_ ǂa Vader, Darth ǂc (Fictitious character). Compare, for example, 100 0_ ǂa Elizabeth ǂb I, ǂc Queen of England, ǂd 1533-1603. Subfield c here is "Titles and other words associated with a name", and besides use for noble or religious titles, often gets used for disambiguating characteristics when the preferred method of birth and/or death dates is not available. (Although I do not in fact see any other Darth Vader to diambiguate from -- though there is a "D. Vader" -- some people are adding "Fictitious character" even when not required so that it's immediately obvious, especially if this person were to be attributed as the author of a work.) But. Like. I kinda want 100 0_ ǂa Vader, ǂc Darth. The see-from reference 400 1_ Skywalker, Anakin ǂc (Fictitious character) can stay, of course. (I think you probably can't combine both those phrases in a single ǂc, though.)

#nerdproblems
ysabetwordsmith: (gold star)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
A library realized that homeless people were hiding books under cushions to finish later.  So the librarians designated a shelf for homeless readers to store their "in use" books.  This is a replicable solution that any library can use if they have a similar challenge.  Meanwhile over in Terramagne, this sort of thing is common.
dialecticdreamer: My work (Default)
[personal profile] dialecticdreamer
Risk Everything for Family
by Dialecticdreamer/Sarah Williams
part 4 of 14
word count (story only): 1310



:: Part of the Polychrome Heroics universe, the Mercedes story set, and picks up immediately after “Popping In,” continuing from Graham's viewpoint. ::




“Abioud,” Aidan began, a smile tugging at the corners of his mouth, “would you please keep an eye on Saraphina and Edison while I offer the good doctor a brief magical mystery tour?”

Graham chortled. “That's a description I can get behind!” He held up a finger. “One thing. If Aida offers to spar with you in the salle, I insist that full padding be worn.”

“I'm not much of a fighter, but I know enough not to hurt a teenage girl,” Abioud protested.

“The padding is for you!” Graham countered, still smiling. “Aida is… relentless, even when she's trying to relax. It's just her nature, even when asking you to spar is a gesture of friendship to her. If you don't want to risk it, believe me, I understand. It's perfectly fine to say no If she asks, though, she's likely to be ready to socialize a little more.”

“You have an interesting family,” Aidan mused, laughing softly.

“The longer you associate with us, the more that word will drift toward 'terrifying' instead,” Graham offered, then licked his finger and pretended to check for breezes. “So far, the wind is holding steady at Interesting-by-Weird-Interesting.”
Read more... )
ysabetwordsmith: Damask smiling over their shoulder (polychrome)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
This poem is spillover from the November 5, 2016 Poetry Fishbowl. It was inspired by prompts from [personal profile] technoshaman, [personal profile] ari_the_dodecahedron, and Anonymous on Dreamwidth. It also fills the "drunk girl / guy" square in my 11-1-16 card for the Fall Festival bingo. This poem has been sponsored by [personal profile] janetmiles. It belongs to the Mallory thread of the Polychrome Heroics series.

Warning: This poem contains some intense topics. Highlight to read the warnings, some of which are spoilers. It includes confusion, indecision, college party hijinks, Whitney sneaking alcohol into a non-alcoholic event, binge-watching television, Whitney passing out drunk on the couch, reference to past alcohol misuse, reference to past rape, Mallory having a panic attack with awful flashbacks and other intrusive images, Heron calling the Student Health Center for Whitney, Mallory crying on Heron, and other angst. But there's a lot of fluff too. If these are sensitive issues for you, please consider your tastes and headspace before reading onward. However, this is a major plot point, so skipping it would leave a gap.

Read more... )

Plugin Problems

Oct. 19th, 2017 07:06 pm
jimhines: (Shego - Facepalm)
[personal profile] jimhines
My Journalpress plugin is no longer posting things to Dreamwidth. I've seen reports that this is due to a change Dreamwidth made in their site security or configuration, but I'm not sure.

I'll be looking for solutions, but in the meantime, you can always find everything on the website at http://www.jimchines.com/blog/

Thursday Yardening

Oct. 19th, 2017 05:13 pm
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
Today is sunny and warm.  Birds are fluttering around.

We went out and scraped ash out of the firepit, so we can build a fire for Samhain.  Then we picked up sticks out of a big pile of leaves that Doug raked up earlier. 

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